Big Tech’s Monopoly on Congress 

As lawmakers in Washington act to shore up the rickety foundations of America’s formal democracy, via the pending update of the Electoral Count Act and the official report and criminal referrals of the January 6 select committee, Congress is also poised to sign off on some preliminary measures to rein in the top-heavy configuration of the country’s political economy.

Source: Big Tech’s Monopoly on Congress | Portside

Congress passes legislation that will close off presidential election mischief and help avoid another Jan. 6

Weaknesses in the law governing how elections are run and votes counted in Congress led to the Jan. 6 insurrection. An election law scholar analyzes legislation just passed to fix those problems.

Source: Congress passes legislation that will close off presidential election mischief and help avoid another Jan. 6

The Railway Labor Act Allowed Congress to Break the Rail Strike. We Should Get Rid of It.

Congress was able to break the rail strike last week because of a century-old law designed to weaken the disruptive power of unions. It’s time to cast aside this law and every other government-mandated strike prohibition that ties the hands of workers.

Source: The Railway Labor Act Allowed Congress to Break the Rail Strike. We Should Get Rid of It.

Sex, the Culture Wars and a Republican Congress 

Netflix is current running the movie, Loving, a dramatization of the true historical drama of the interracial love affair and marriage of Richard and Mildred Loving. The film is set in in mid-1950s thru mid-‘60s Virginia and depicts the couples’ friendship and love.  It also shows that their sexual relationship was accepted by their respective families and immediate community. Nevertheless, the movie makes clear that their 1956 marriage was condemned; they were arrested, and Mrs. Loving jailed.

Source: Sex, the Culture Wars and a Republican Congress – CounterPunch.org

The midterms will see a number of nonreligious candidates – but why is it so hard for atheists to get voted into Congress?

Despite growing numbers of non-religious Americans, self-declared atheists are few and far between in the halls of power – putting the US at odds with other global democracies.

Source: The midterms will see a number of nonreligious candidates – but why is it so hard for atheists to get voted into Congress?